DATA NATURE …

Monday, 7th of November, 2005 @ 3:37am

... the strange, and sometimes beautiful mix of the electronic and organic.

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Ben Hooker

CITY-LIMIT LIVING

Monday, 7th of November, 2005 @ 3:23am

From our many orbits of London, driving in and out of the city limits, we have become enthusiastic connoisseurs of the landscapes created where open country rubs up against pockets of suburbia and the city’s transport networks. In terms of scale, texture and animation, these places are unique. They contain unregulated tracts of land, put to eclectic use, which present intriguing vistas full of brutal thresholds. And although these are lonely places, removed from the city proper, they are populated (albeit transiently) by the thousands of people who daily speed through them in their vehicles. But what happens if you leave your vehicle? Outside our car – unshielded, un-power-assisted – exploring hard shoulders, climbing motorway embankments, standing under flight paths, we found ourselves exhilarated. It’s thrilling to be so out of scale with the massive shapes and high velocities of these frontier environments, to feel free of the city and yet reconnected to it in a way that is raw, visceral.

The turbulent, wreckage-strewn perimeter of the city demarcates more than just its physical edges. It also represents a transition in the landscape’s invisible characteristics: a change in its air chemistry, its temperature, and the density of its electromagnetic space of media channels and data networks. Approaching London, a dormant car radio will crackle into life as the city’s radio stations come within range – the pop and hiss of the patchy radio ‘landscape’ analogous to the fragmented texture of the visual landscape beyond the windscreen.

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Ben Hooker

playing with scale

Saturday, 22nd of October, 2005 @ 2:04am

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[image 1, artist unkown; image 2, Vito Anccoci; image 3, webcam image]

Ben Hooker

Most of the world sees nothing above but the sun

Tuesday, 11th of October, 2005 @ 6:12am

"Most of the world sees nothing above but the sun, [...] They know not the horsehead nebula, the collars of Saturn like metal coils around the neck of a Benin princess, the vast black sinks of imploded matter like drain holes in outer space, the throbbing light of pulsars, atomizing suns, dwarf stars heavy beyond belief, red giants, the uncoiling galaxies. I am not talking about the jingoistic bus ride to the moon or the doggies woofing in weightless capsules among the planetary detritus, the petty and costly face slaps of the pudding powers. [...] No, the study of space unwraps the strangest and most exotic realities the human mind can ever encounter. [...] Nothing seems impossible in space. Nothing is impossible. All is strange and wondrous in that nonhuman void. This is why astronomers do not seek the company of any but their fellows, for no one else has seen the mysteries as they have. Theirs is a ghastly joy felt in exploding stars, in galactic death. They know the dim light of a star filtering through our filthy, polluted sky has been on its way to that moment for a thousand years. [...] Look into the sky and you are looking into time and nothing that you see is now – it is all so remote and ancient that the human mind quails and shrinks as it approaches. Listen, extinction is the fate of all species, including ours. But before we go maybe we’ll get a quick look at a blinding light.”

from ‘Poscards’ by E. Annie Proulx

Ben Hooker

First ever picture of Earth and Moon from space.

Tuesday, 11th of October, 2005 @ 6:03am

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This picture of a crescent-shaped Earth and Moon—the first of its kind ever taken by a spacecraft—was recorded Sept. 18, 1977, by NASA’s Voyager 1 when it was 7.25 million miles (11.66 million kilometers) from Earth. The Moon is at the top of the picture and beyond the Earth as viewed by Voyager.

Ben Hooker

panning and scanning, video gardening, noise farming…

Wednesday, 5th of October, 2005 @ 10:59am

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(image of children watching TV taken from short film “Evidence” by Godfrey Reggio.)

Ben Hooker